Flash Still Sucking [Battery] ?

Flash Still Sucking [Battery] ?

It hurts to see that Flash is still sucking as usual even in 2015! Well, it sucks so much that Google had been trying to get Adobe to fix it. Simply put, Flash sucks battery so much that Google would like Adobe to address that. One of the proposed solutions that they are working on is to pause Flash content as much as possible to save the CPU from running the bad code! Sounds like a root-canal procedure, right?

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First Impressions: Swift Away from Objective-Freaking-C

First Impressions: Swift Away from Objective-Freaking-C

wift might be just what Apple needed to get the App store come up to par with Google Play in terms of app development efforts. Let’s face it, Objective-C is horrifically verbose and frankly who really needs to mess with pointers and memory management on his own? Unless you are building software for the next drone delivery system or cutting edge game with all things custom, you really shouldn’t need to mess with pointers. So we like Swift! It points you away from the pointers!

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Yah! WordPress.org Approves Our FCC Slow Lane Plugin

Yah! WordPress.org Approves Our FCC Slow Lane Plugin

We know that even if all the Wordpress sites in the world used our new advocacy plugin — the FCC Slow Lane — to demonstrate to FCC what a “slow lane” to the internet feels like, there is a good chance that it won’t effective. But we can hope that it will and hope is a powerful state of mind. So we are hopeful and happy to announce that Wordpress.org — the sole authority on public release of Wordpress plugin has approved our very first advocacy plugin! Yah!

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Avoiding Feature Creep in Your Web Site Project

Avoiding Feature Creep in Your Web Site Project

Boundary-less, open-ended projects are subject to feature creep. Unfortunately, most website projects don’t have well defined scope. Since a website is a public face of an organization, typically there are too many stakeholders: marketing department, IT, the executives, etc. that asset themselves in a website project scope and increase the chances of feature creep: the creepy path to endless, useless features without intelligent design.

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Your EUR Rights to be Forgotten

Your EUR Rights to be Forgotten

Dear Fellow Americans: European Union, known for tough consumer privacy concerns, has finally handed Google and other search engines a new law that requires these services to “respect” the consumers rights to be “forgotten.”

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Elon Musk: Why I didn’t buy a Tesla Model S Last Week

Elon Musk: Why I didn’t buy a Tesla Model S Last Week

Mr. Elon Musk, recently I had the chance to look at a Tesla Model S from a car buyer’s prospective. I was impressed by the look of the car and almost considered ordering one. However, thanks to your no-pressure sales, I didn’t have to make any impulse decision, which was a good thing. It’s been few days since I have looked at the model-s but I would still buy one in a heartbeat only if you would make a few small but important changes. First of all, the Maserati inspired design is simply beautiful. You picked the right design team. The interior is extremely roomy. The huge trunk in the back, the storage space under the hood and the transmission hump free middle seat and space between the driver and front-passenger seat are just a delight. However, what made me have second thoughts are what I like to tell you now. The huge 17-inch display is very functional but somehow looked odd. The display was just not as “crisp” as I thought it would be. The touchscreen felt like I was using a jumbo-sized Samsung tablet instead of my ipad. The icons, text and user interface looked and felt very early androidish. I don’t know what you are running as the OS under the hood, but it didn’t give me a luxury feeling. Sorry. However, even if I had convinced myself that the car UI requires significant critical response considerations and perhaps a car’s graphical display needs to be very fast and responsive and therefore its OK to sacrifice an Apple-like awesomeness in look and feel, I still have... read more
The Heartbleed Briefing for the President

The Heartbleed Briefing for the President

Mr. President, there has been a security incident on the internet that has world-wide implications and therefore we wish to bring it to your attention. This widespread security issue is officially known as the CVE-2014-0160 vulnerability. Simply put, the stack of software that makes the security infrastructure of the internet work have been exposed to a major risk due to bad, unaudited programming practices in a single piece of free software called the OpenSSL. This critical software is used in anything from web servers to CISCO routers to smartphones and therefore the scale of the impact is world-wide. The CVE-2014-0160 has been nicknamed “heartbleed” as it relates to the heart beat extension of the OpenSSL software. Unlike prior security vulnerabilities, this one has been getting a lot of media attentions as it affects nearly everything on the internet. The change in the OpenSSL code dates back approximately two or more years. So it is safe to say that any hacker that knew about this vulnerability could have been exploiting it for a long period of time. All indications are that this is not a foreign threat from China or Russia. We believe that the freely available OpenSSL software maintained by unpaid volunteer programmers made a grave mistake in trusting the rest of the programmers (hackers) and created this mess. When a bad guy programmer decides to abuse this software running on a remote server, all s/he has to do is lie about the size of data it sent to the server and in return get more data back that were under normal circumstance not available to the bad guys.... read more

All You Can Eat SSH

We use SSH a lot to access dev/production servers to many super-geeky devices such as remote power strips, KVMs, storage devices, etc. Managing password based ssh access and remember non-standard ports become painful. And if you are new to ssh or command-line business like some web developers, it can be more painful. Here I will provide a list of tips and tricks that I use to enhance my SSH experience. Never Run SSH on Port 22 First thing we do when we setup a SSH server is relocate the listening port from 22 to something greater than 1024 to keep the kiddie port scanners out of sniffing range. When you use default SSH port, you are subjecting your server to unwanted attention too easily. If a port scanner rings 22 and your server does not respond, the scanner moves to next service or tries other “typical” unofficial ssh ports and then gives up and goes to next node or so. It is very good idea to restrict SSH access to high port and also limit direct SSH from known sub nets or other servers. Key-based Access to Remote SSH Servers When accessing a lot of SSH server from desktop/laptop etc, it is a pain to remember the passwords so it is best to share your public keys so with the SSH server to enable key-based access. To setup a key-based access what you need to do is as follows: On your desktop/laptop (in my case, a mac book pro and mac mini), run ssh-keygen to generate the necessary RSA keys in ~/.ssh directory. If you enter a password for... read more
How Mobile Mesh Networks Will Change the World

How Mobile Mesh Networks Will Change the World

Just imagine that you are in the Angel Stadium in Anaheim, CA watching U2 live in a concert from a nosebleed seat and wishing you had spent a few more bucks to get a better seat. No worries, fire up your mesh networking app on your mobile device — my personal preference would be an iOS7 device — and you can now see what your fellow luckier U2 fans see from their unique vantage points. Fellow U2 fans with better seats can hold up their iPhones or oversized Android things while running a mesh network app that allows them to stream video form their vantage points to other fellow not-so-lucky fans. But wait, U2 would like to get in on this, right? Sure, they can use a geo-fence and push their RED campaign messaging on the app so that people can enjoy the various user-generated live video streams from every corner and yet receive the band’s sponsored messages. This is a win-win situation for both fans and the band. Yes, this is where we are heading with the mesh networks on mobile devices. Near future users are going to participate in enhancing their group public event experience using ad-hoc mesh networks that do not give a dime to the mammoth, backward cell phone data providers. If all you want to do is share experiences with local friends and family, you don’t need to give an arm-and-a-leg to the cell companies. All kidding aside, a better use case is really the rural or poorly connected areas of our world where infrastructure wifi thru a router connected to the internet is... read more